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Jury
The names of the jury members are announced after the video preselection round, together with the names of the selected candidates.

While the composition of the jury may vary from one round to another, members of the jury attend the whole of the round that they have been appointed to judge. Each member of the jury gives his or her marks for all the candidates to the ministerial official at the end of each round. The members of the jury may not vote for their own students. No consultation takes place between them.
The role of the Chairperson of the jury is to direct the operations of the competition. He or she is assisted in this task by a Secretary. Neither takes part in the voting. As from 2019, the jury of the next instrumental sessions (2019, 2020 & 2021) is chaired by Gilles Ledure, that of the next voice session (2022) by Bernard Foccroulle.
Personalities
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Chairperson of the Jury
Count Eugène Traey (1915-2006) was born in Amsterdam of Belgian parents and studied music at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Antwerp, where his piano teacher was Emmanuel Durlet. He went on to study in Paris under Robert Casadesus and in Germany under Karl Leimer and Walter Gieseking. After this international training as a pianist, Eugène Traey pursued a career both as a concert performer and a teacher at the Royal Conservatory of Antwerp, of which he was the director until 1980. He gave recitals, performed with orchestras and took part in chamber music recitals with Arthur Grumiaux and Jean Laurent, as well as performing piano duos with Frédéric Gevers. He was the founder of the deSingel concert hall in Antwerp and was a regular member of juries at international competitions (Moscow, Warsaw, Munich and Tokyo, among others). From 1982 until 1995 Eugène Traey presided over the jury of the Queen Elisabeth Competition.
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Member of the jury
Pierre Amoyal won First Prize in the violin at the Paris Conservatory at the age of 12. At 17 he moved to study in Los Angeles under Jascha Heifetz, with whom he played chamber music and made his first recordings. Five years later he was playing all over Europe and in Japan, performing with the most prestigious orchestras and the greatest conductors (including P. Boulez, S. Ozawa, C. Dutoit, G. Herbig, L. Maazel, K. Sanderling, and M.W. Chung). His many recordings for Decca have included Fauré’s sonatas, the Chausson Concert, and the Franck sonata, as well as the Dutilleux, Saint-Saëns, and Respighi concertos. Appointed a professor at the Conservatoire National in Paris at a very young age, he has also taught at the Lausanne Conservatory, Haute École de Musique, where he founded the Camerata de Lausanne in 2002, recently renamed CameratAmoyal. Made up of 14 talented young musicians from all over the world, the Camerata has recorded a number of CDs. Pierre Amoyal teaches as well at the Mozarteum in Salzburg. He is a Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres and a Chevalier dans l’Ordre National du Mérite. In 2006 he received the Prix de la Ville de Lausanne. Pierre Amoyal owns one of the world’s most celebrated violins, the 1717 ‘Kochansky’ Stradivarius, which was miraculously found in 1991 after being stolen in 1987.
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Member of the jury
After graduating from Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music in 1948, Toshiya Eto studied at the Curtis Institute of Music with Efrel Zimbalist. While attending the conservatory, he gave a recital at Carnegie Hall in 1951. He devoted himself to educating younger players, including Akiko Suwanai and Mariko Senju. A member of the Japan Art Academy, he served as chief of Toho Gakuen School of Music. He has recorded for RCA.
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Member of the jury
Tuomas Haapanen studied the violin at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki. After his debut in 1948 he pursued his studies in Paris with Léon Nauwinck and René Benedetti. In addition to a fine career as soloist and chamber musician, he has also been appointed concert master for the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra and the Helsinki Chamber Orchestra. In 1962 he was appointed head violin teacher at the Turku Conservatory, and in 1978 he became violin professor at the Sibelius Academy; where, from 1987 to 1990, he also acted as principal. He has held master classes in Europe, America and Japan, and many of his students have won prizes in international competitions. Tuomas Haapanen acted as the chairman of the International Jean Sibelius Violin Competition from 1981 to 2001, and has regularly been invited to serve as member of the jury in most major violin competitions. In 1999 he received the Finnish State Music Prize.
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Member of the jury
Né à Riga (Lettonie), Philippe Hirshhorn (1946-1996) commence ses études au conservatoire de sa ville natale avec Waldemar Sturestep, avant de se perfectionner chez Michael Waiman au conservatoire de Leningrad (St. Petersbourg). En 1965 il gagne le 2e prix du Concours Paganini et en 1967, à l'âge de 21 ans, il remporte le Grand Prix du Concours Reine Elisabeth. Depuis lors, il se produit avec les orchestres les plus prestigieux, dont le Berliner Philharmoniker, London Symphony, Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Wiener Symphoniker, sous la baguette de chefs comme H. von Karajan, Sir Colin Davis, G. Tozhdestvensky et Y. Temirkanov. Il est invité à se produire dans les grands festivals tels que Lucerne, Lockenhaus, Grenade, Brescia-Bergame, Berlin, Schleswig-Holstein, etc. En musique de chambre, il compte parmi ses partenaires priviligiés M. Argerich, G. Kremer, G. Opitz, M. Maisky et L. Leonskaya. Philippe Hirshhorn s'installe en Belgique en 1973 et prend la nationalité de son pays d'adoption. Il enseigne dans les conservatoires de Bruxelles et d'Utrecht.
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Member of the jury
Herman Krebbers made his first public appearance as a nine-year-old prodigy. Since 1945 he has toured the United States, France, Germany, Switzerland, Poland, Italy, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Belgium, Argentina, Russia, Portugal and England. He received a Golden Record for his interpretations of the Beethoven, Brahms and Mozart violin concertos together with the Concertgebouw orchestra, as well as an Edison for Haydn’s two concertos. He has recorded concertos by Paganini, Dvorák, Viotti No. 22, Bruch, Vieuxtemps No. 4, Bach A moll, Brahms’ double-concerto with Tibor de Machula on cello, Vivaldi and Bach double-concertos with Theo Olof on violin, Vivaldi’s Four Seasons, Saint Saens’ Havanaise and Rondo Capriccioso and Ravel’s Tzigane. Herman Krebbers was a professor at the Robert Schumann Hochschule Düsseldorf and has taught at the Sweelinck Conservatory in Amsterdam for over 30 years. He has served as a jury member at competitions around the world. To give master classes, he has been invited to Japan, Canada, France, Spain, South Africa, England, Belgium, Germany, Italy and Holland. On account of his many contributions to musical life in the Netherlands, he was appointed Officer in the Order of Oranje-Nassau.
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Member of the jury
Jaime Laredo has had a distinguished career, spanning more than fifty years, as a soloist, orchestral conductor, and chamber musician. His musical personality was strongly influenced by his experience as a pupil of musicians such as J. Gingold, P. Casals, I. Galamian, and G. Szell. His First Prize in the Queen Elisabeth Competition, at the age of 17, launched his international career ; since then, he has appeared, as a soloist and as a conductor, with the world’s greatest orchestras. He has worked with conductors such as D. Barenboim, Z. Mehta, S. Ozawa, L. Slatkin, C. Davis, E. Ormandy, L. Stokowski, and G. Szell. He has also performed regularly as a member of the Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Trio and alongside his wife, the cellist Sharon Robinson. Jaime Laredo has recorded almost 100 discs, a number of which have won awards : his recording of the Brahms piano quartets with his regular partners Emmanuel Ax, Isaac Stern, and Yo-Yo Ma, for example, won a Grammy Award. Having previously taught at the Curtis Institute of Music and at Indiana University’s Jacob School of Music, he now teaches at the Cleveland Institute of Music. Jaime Laredo is Music Director of the Vermont Symphony Orchestra and Principal Conductor of the Westchester Philharmonic. He and his wife are the Artistic Directors of the Linton Chamber Music Series in Cincinnati.
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Member of the jury
After a thorough musical education in Paris and London under Jacques Thibaud, Carl Flesch and Max Rostal, Yfrah Neaman (1923-2003) made his sensational debut in London in 1944 and rapidly conquered the great concert houses of the world. He was an eloquent and tireless champion of twentieth-century composers, whose works - many written especially for him - he has introduced to audiences around the world. He was Professor of Violin and Department Head of the Guildhall School of Music in London and had been offered guest professorships at conservatories and colleges of music all over the world. As an internationally acclaimed teacher, Yfrah Neaman gave regular master classes troughout Europe, the United States and the Far East. He was also a regular member of the jury of all the major international violin competitions and the joint Artistic Director of the London International Quartet Competition. He was made a Freeman of the City of London in 1980, and in 1983 was honoured with the Order of the British Empire. In 1997, the Worshipful Company of Musicians offered him the prestigious Cobbett Medal. In 1998, he was awarded a Doctorate Honoris Causa from the National Academy of Music in Sofia, Bulgaria, and received the title of Professor Emeritus for service to the Guildhall School of Music and Drama.
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Member of the jury
Ricardo Odnoposoff was born to Russian immigrants in Buenos Aires. The young man's exceptional musical talent induced his parents to strive for a musical education for him in Europe. An attempt to study with Leopold Auer, was unsuccessful, as the legendary teacher of several generations of violinists who for decades dominated the international musical scene (among them Jascha Heifetz, Nathan Milstein, and Misha Elman), hesitated because of his advanced age to take on such a young pupil. Therefore, upon the recommendation of Erich Kleiber, Ricardo Odnoposoff studied with the concertmaster Rudolf Deman in Berlin, and after only a few months changed to the studio of Carl Flesch. Ricardo Odnoposoff received his diploma in 1932 after four years of study, but there was another event in that year which had more decisive consequences for the young violinist. In June, the eighteen year old was awarded a prize at the First International Competition for Voice and Violin in Vienna, and the interest of those in influential musical circles was awakened, among them Vienna State Opera director Clemens Krauss. The concertmasters of the opera and of the Philharmonic at the time, Arnold Rosé, Julius Stwertka and Franz Mairecker, were on average over 60 years old. As far back as 1923, Richard Strauss had noted the difficulties of the long-time concertmaster Karl Prill, which led to the violin solo in Strauss' Bürger als Edelmann being performed by Heinrich Schwarz. Prill retired in 1925, but the situation did not greatly improve. Clemens Krauss, who in many difficult situations in the history of the Philharmonic took decisive action, seized the opportunity and in 1933, without an audition, offered the 19 year old Odnoposoff a position as concertmaster. Ricardo Odnoposoff's first performance at the concertmaster's desk was in Verdi's Othello on December 25, 1933, and his first major Philharmonic test was a gala concert for Richard Strauss' 70th birthday on June 10, 1934. Wilhelm Furtwängler conducted Ein Heldenleben and insisted that Odnoposoff perform the violin solo. Until 1937, he appeared seven times as a soloist with the Vienna Philharmonic, among them two performances of Mozart's Violin Concerto in A major, KV 219. For the 100th birthday of Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921), he made his debut in the subscription concert series with that composer's Violin Concerto in B minor, op. 61, on January 25 and 26, 1936, under Felix von Weingartner. In Ricardo Odnoposoff's own words, it was necessary for a young Philharmonic concertmaster to present oneself even more prominently as a soloist, and he therefore performed a recital which included the violin concerti of Johannes Brahms and Antonín Dvorák, as well as the Mozart Concerto in D major, KV 218, under the direction of Josef Krips and accompanied by the Philharmonic. In addition, he made numerous other solo appearances in Vienna and on tour, among these a sonata recital with Bruno Walter as pianist on December 2, 1935. This artistic collaboration extended to the Philharmonic concerts also, as Odnoposoff performed a major orchestral solo, the aria from Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's opera Il re pastore with Elisabeth Schumann during a Philharmonic tour to London under Walter's direction in June 1937. On this same tour, Odnoposoff represented the orchestra in a special way, performing violin compositions by Fritz Kreisler at a gala at the Austrian embassy. Probably the most decisive event in Ricardo Odnoposoff's career occurred in 1937. The Ysaÿe Competition was characterized that year by the legendary artistic duel between Ricardo Odnoposoff, Second Prize, and David Oistrakh, First Prize. This sensational success drew considerable attention internationally, and led to a reordering of Odnoposoff's career. His numerous offers to perform as a soloist led him to relinquish his position as concertmaster and he left Austria in the autumn of 1938, with the political developments of the time also playing a role in this decision. Upon returning to Vienna from solo engagements in Italy, he was suddenly refused admission to the opera house. After Austria's annexation by Nazi Germany, Odnoposoff, who had taken on Austrian citizenship and became an enthusiastic Viennese, was, because of the Argentine citizenship which he still maintained, no longer welcome in his own land. He travelled to Belgium, and subsequently returned to Argentina in 1940. In 1942 he debuted in New York, where he lived until 1956. In that year he returned to Vienna and became Professor at the Music Academy in 1957. He taught at that institution until 1973 and counted three future Vienna Philharmonic members, Paul Guggenberger (1941-2000), Ortwin Ottmaier and Edward Kudlak (retired September 2003), among his students. Odnoposoff's activities as a pedagogue were not limited to Vienna, as he taught in Stuttgart, and until 1994 in Zurich. Despite this extensive teaching work, the focal point of his career remained the concert stage, as thousands of public appearances and a notable number of recordings confirm. Many of those recordings have fortunately been re-released on CD. After the Second World War, Ricardo Odnoposoff appeared six times with his former Viennese colleagues. On February 1 and 2, 1947 he performed the Brahms concerto with Josef Krips in the subscription concert series, and in 1961 played the Sinfonia concertante, KV 364, with principal violist Rudolf Streng, conducted by Carl Schuricht, for the Mozart gala concert in Innsbruck, as well as for two concerts during Salzburg's Mozart Week. The last appearance of Ricardo Odnoposoff with the Vienna Philharmonic was on June 13, 1965, in the main auditorium of the Konzerthaus, when he played the premiere of the Violin Concerto of Theodor Berger, with Eugene Ormandy conducting. There was one last personal meeting at the Musikverein on February 25, 1994. Upon his 80th birthday, Ricardo Odnoposoff was awarded the honorary ring of the Vienna Philharmonic after a rehearsal on the podium of the Golden Hall. The ring, surely the orchestra's most personal decoration, was awarded in honor of an artist who, though only belonging to the Philharmonic for four years, remained his entire life a proponent of our orchestra. Until the end of his life he maintained close contact with the Vienna Philharmonic, not only through his former student Ortwin Ottmaier, but also by his personal interest and identification with the orchestra.
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Member of the jury
Igor Oistrakh, the son and pupil of David Oistrakh, was born in Odessa in 1931. He won first prizes in the Budapest International Competition of 1949 and at the Wieniawski International Competition in Poznan´ in 1952. His Western debut took place at the Royal Albert Hall in London and was followed by concert tours throughout the world. Igor Oistrakh has performed with the world’s greatest orchestras under conductors such as O. Klemperer, F. Reiner, H. von Karajan, E. Ormandy, C.M. Giulini, G. Solti, L. Maazel, S. Ozawa, and G. Rozhdestvensky. He also performed with Pablo Casals and Yehudi Menuhin. For 27 years Igor Oistrakh played in a unique duo with his father, with whom he made several recordings. Since 1968 he has conducted chamber and symphony orchestras as well as performing as a viola player. He has recorded for EMI, Deutsche Grammophon, Decca, RCA, Collins, Melodia, and Art and Electronics. The recipient of numerous awards, he is President of the Fondation César Franck and serves on the jury of highly prestigious violin competitions (including the Tchaikovsky, Wieniawski, and Carl Flesch competions). Since 1996 he has been a professor at the Royal Conservatory in Brussels.
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