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Competitions / VIOLIN 1963 / Candidates / Candidates
Candidates
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First prize - Queen Elisabeth International Grand Prize
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Second Prize
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Third Prize
Arnold Steinhardt was born in Los Angeles, receiving his early training from Karl Moldrem, Peter Meremblum and Toscha Seidel, and making his solo debut with the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra at age fourteen. He continued his studies with Ivan Galamian at the Curtis Institute of Music and with Joseph Szigeti in Switzerland in 1962 under the sponsorship of George Szell. Winner of the Philadelphia Youth Competition in 1957, the 1958 Leventritt Award, and Bronze Medallist in the Queen Elisabeth Competition in 1963, Arnold Steinhardt has appeared throughout North America and Europe as a recitalist and soloist with orchestras including the New York Philharmonic, Detroit Symphony, and the Cleveland Orchestra, among others. Arnold Steinhardt is first violinist and a founding member (1964) of the internationally acclaimed Guarneri String Quartet, with which he has made innumerable tours across the globe and recorded dozens of albums for RCA Victor, Philips, Arabesque and Surrounded By Entertainment. The quartet retired in 2009. He is professor of violin and chamber music at Colburn Music School, the University of Maryland, Bard College, and the Curtis Institute of Music. Arnold Steinhardt has written two books: Indivisible by Four: A String Quartet in Pursuit of Harmony (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1998); and Violin Dreams (Houghton Mifflin, 2006). He is the author of articles which have appeared in Chamber Music America, Musical America and Keynote. Recipient of Honorary Doctorates from the University of South Florida and Harpur College, Arnold Steinhardt has also received an award for distinguished cultural service from the City of New York presented by Mayor Koch. He was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2010. His recordings include Franz Schubert's complete works for violin and piano with Seymour Lipkin on Newport Classic, American Journey on Naxos Records with his brother Victor Steinhard featuring a variety of seldom heard American music and three new works written for him, two CD’s on Sheffield Lab with pianist Lincoln Mayorga: Strauss and Dvorak and Romantic Music for Violin and Piano which he recorded "direct-to-disc"; and a TownHall recording of unaccompanied Bach works. Arnold Steinhardt plays a Lorenzo Storioni violin from Cremona, Italy, late 18th century.
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Fifth Prize
Charles Castleman has been soloist with the orchestras of Philadelphia, Boston, Brisbane, Chicago, Hong Kong, Moscow, Mexico City, New York, San Francisco, Seoul and Shanghai. Medalist at the Tchaikovsky and Queen Elisabeth Competitions, his Jongen Concerto is included in a Cypres CD set of prize-winning performances of the Queen Elisabeth Competition’s 50-year history. Charles Castleman’s solo CDs include Ysaÿe’s six Solo Sonatas (made at the time of his unique performance at Tully Hall in NYC), eight Hubay Csardases for Violin and Orchestra, and ten Sarasate virtuoso cameos on Music and Arts, Gershwin and Antheil on MusicMasters, and contemporary violin and harpsichord music for Albany. As one of sixteen Ford Foundation Concert Artists he commissioned the David Amram Concerto, premiering it with Leonard Slatkin and the St. Louis Symphony, recording it for Newport Classic. He is dedicatee of Lares Hercii by Pulitzer winner Christopher Rouse. He has performed at such international festivals as Marlboro, Grant Park, Newport, Sarasota, AFCM (Australia), Akaroa (New Zealand), Budapest, Fuefukigawa, Montreux, Shanghai, Sheffield, and the Vienna Festwoche. He regularly participates in the Park City, Round Top and Sitka festivals in the U.S. His recitals have been broadcast on NPR, BBC, in Berlin and in Paris. Charles Castleman has been Professor of Violin at Eastman since 1975. He has conducted master classes in London, Vienna, Helsinki, Kiev, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Seoul, Tokyo, and all major cities in Australia, Canada and New Zealand. His students have been winners at Brussels, Munich, Naumburg and Szeryng, are in 30 professionally active chamber groups and are 1st desk players in 11 major orchestras. He is founder/director of the Castleman Quartet Program. Charles Castleman’s long-term chamber music associations have included the New String Trio of N.Y. with BASF recordings of Reger and Frank Martin and the Raphael Trio with CDs of Dvorak, Mendelssohn, Beethoven, and Wolf-Ferrari for Nonesuch, Sony Classical, Discover, Unicorn, and ASV, and with premieres by Rainer Bischof and Frederic Rzewski for the Vienna Festival and Kennedy Center. Charles Castleman earned degrees from Harvard, Curtis, and University of Pennsylvania. His teachers were Emanuel Ondricek (teaching assistant of Sevcik, Ysaÿe student) and Ivan Galamian, his most influential coaches David Oistrakh, Szeryng, and Gingold. He plays the Marquis de Champeaux Stradivarius and Matteo Goffriller violins from 1708, and chooses from more than 80 bows.
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Sixth Prize
Masuko Ushioda has performed with major orchestras throughout the world and has appeared at the Marlboro and Spoleto festivals. She was the first-prize winner of the 1956 Mainichi competition of Tokyo and second prize winner at the Tchaikovsky Competition in 1966. A graduate of the Toho Gakuen School of Music, she also studied with Joseph Szigeti in Switzerland, Mikail Weiman at the Leningrad Conservatory, and Anna Ono in Japan. She was a teacher at the New England Conservatory and made recordings for Angel, Toshiba and Melodiya.
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Seventh Prize
Prize-winner at the Paganini, Bavarian Radio and Queen Elisabeth International Competitions, Israeli-born Yossi Zivoni studied with Oeden Partos in Tel Aviv and André Gertler in Brussels. Following his Amsterdam debut in 1963, he performed worldwide as soloist with leading orchestras and conductors (Kurt Sanderling, Erich Leinsdorf, Charles Groves). His latest CD recordings (Meridian label) include the Mendelssohn Sonatas, Bartok Solo Sonata, and Bach Solo Sonatas and Partitas, well received internationally. Between 1990 and 1996, Yossi Zivoni was the artistic director of the Entrecasteaux International Music Festival in Provence. Yossi Zivoni started teaching in 1973 at the RNCM and is now on the faculty of the Royal College of Music in London. Many of his pupils occupy eminent positions in the musical world. Since 1995, he has been the leader of the Gabrieli String Quartet.
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Eighth Prize
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Ninth Prize
Jean Ter-Mergerian received the first prize for violin at the Marseilles Conservatoire at the age of 11. In the same year he gave his first recital, performing Vivaldi’s Concerto in A minor and Mendelssohn’s Concerto in E minor. He continued his musical studies in Yerevan with Karp Dombayev and then at the Moscow Conservatory in the class of David Oistrakh. He is a prizewinner of international violin competitions, such as the Prague Spring, Tchaikovsky and Queen Elisabeth competitions. He also got the first Grand Prize at the Jacques Thibaud Competition. Jean Ter-Mergerian taught at the Yerevan Komitas State Conservatory, having simultaneously multiple concerts in the ex-USSR, Western Europe, South America, the United States and Canada. His solo performances were accompanied by orchestras of different countries conducted by famous conductors, among which Aram Khachaturian conducting his own violin concerto. Jean Ter-Merguerian is a member of juries of international competitions: Paganini in Italy, Sarasate in Spain, Tchaikovsky in Moscow etc. Living in France, he gives master classes there and abroad.
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Tenth Prize
After some early studies in Tokyo, violinist and conductor Hidetaro Suzuki (Tokyo, 1939) worked from 1956-63 with Efrem Zimbalist at the Curtis Institute. He was a finalist in the 1962 Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow and a finalist in the 1963 and 1967 Queen Elisabeth Competitions, and won second prize in the 1966 Montreal International Competition. While he was concertmaster of the Quebec Symphony Orchestra (1963-77) he also performed with the orchestra as soloist and guest conductor. In addition, he taught at the Conservatoire de Musique du Québec, where Pierre Mongrain was one of his pupils. Hidetaro Suzuki has toured in the USA, Japan, the USSR, France, Belgium, Cuba, and Canada, both as a soloist with orchestra and in recital, accompanied by his wife, the pianist Zeyda Suzuki, with whom he organises the Suzuki & Friends chamber music series. His large repertoire, extending from the classics to contemporary works, is served by a strong technique and a keen musicality. He is a former concertmaster of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra.
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